Visceral Pain in Fibromyalgia

fibromyalgia visceral pain

Fibromyalgia patients are very familiar with pain. Living with this chronic condition can lead to several painful symptoms. Are you aware that pain is available in different forms?


In an effort to help people suffering from chronic pain, doctors came up with a system for classifying pain. One of the categories is known as visceral pain. This pain is among the most painful of all and can indicate serious problems with the body.

What Is Visceral Pain?

Pain is classified into two major categories – neuropathic and nociceptive. Nociceptive pain refers to the normal response of the body against an injury as a result of the damage to the body tissues. On the other hand, neuropathic pain comes from the nervous system.

Visceral pain falls under nociceptive pain which mostly originates from within the body tissues. Visceral pain generally affects the body’s inner organs also known as viscera. This refers to the organs within the abdomen such as the kidneys, lungs, heart and liver. Due to the way our nerves form around the viscera, the inner organs feel pain differently from other parts of the body. For instance, these organs feel more pain when being stretched or twisted as compared to being sliced or cut. This because the nerves of the inner organs are more sensitive to some types of pain. Hence, visceral pain can feel very different from other forms of pain.

What Does Visceral Pain Feel Like?

Visceral pain feels like a fuzzy, undesirable sensation which spreads across the midriff. When suffering from the pain, it can be difficult to know where exactly the pain is coming from. Visceral pain can produce mood symptoms. Patients who experience such pain also experience moodiness or anxiety.

One example of visceral pain is the pain you feel when suffering from kidney stones. This condition is known for being the most painful condition. In fact, some people deem the pain as worse than childbirth. In general, inflammation or injury of the organs can result in severe visceral pain. For example, heart attack, hepatitis or any blood clots preventing blood flow to organs can result in visceral pain.

There are several other less common sources of visceral pain in our body organs. Your doctor can provide you with a diagnosis of what may be causing the pain. Such diagnosis can help to determine how your pain can be treated.

How Can You Treat Visceral Pain?

The first thing doctors do is to assist the patient in dealing with the pain itself. There are various ways to do this. In most cases, opioid pain relievers or nerve block is administered to the patient. The doctor injects the medication directly to the nerves to stop pain.

After helping the patient in managing the pain, the doctor starts identifying the causes of pain. Treatment often focuses on fixing any underlying issues. For conditions where the patient suffers from kidney stones, the doctor uses a machine for treatment. This machine sends shockwaves into the kidneys in order to break down the stones to smaller pieces. In doing so, the stones can pass through the kidney easily.

The type of treatment that you get mainly depends on the condition that you have. Always check with your doctor once you start feeling an excruciating pain that is different from your usual fibromyalgia symptoms. Your doctor can recommend ways to effectively treat the pain.

10 Comments

  • since my diagnosis October 2017 alot of things fell into place …. I was diagnosed with Dystonia in 1996 …rheumatoid arthritis in 2016 ….. maybe the pain I feel all relates … so maybe I’ve had Fybromyalgia longer than I thought ….. ŕegards Adele Bretherton

  • I have been having horrible pain that just started in my stomach area that is excruciating. It gets so bad that I cannot go to work. It goes away, but comes back, does this sound familiar?

    • I have been suffering with this type of pain for several years, not able to describe exactly how it hurts. I have overwhelming nausea and cold chills on and off. Been to a gastroenterologist, internist and rheumotologist. Next stop is an endocrinologist. I have a part time job that I have called off from more times than I like because I’ve been too sick to leave the house. Not sure how long I can hang on feeling like this. Not sure what to do next. I feel your pain.

  • I have had severe stomach pain since I had chronic sickness which came on suddenly, was investigated but never solved, it only comes on for a few hours usually, but I get painful stomach rumbles. I do have gall stones, but decided they don’t react to fatty foods, so probably aren’t the problem. I think the idea of doctors administering pain relief before investigating is somewhat of a fantasy, even if the pain reaction isn’t necessary comfort isn’t their priority, the diagnosis is. If GPs fob you off, you can request to see a specialist.

  • I have been getting stomach pains for about twenty years. They come a lot when I bend over or twist certain ways. Docs don’t know what it is.

  • I’ve had stomach problems for a good 30 years off and on and have seen a gastroenterologist for several years still having issues. Been treated for diverticulitis off and on with antibiotics still have issues bad.

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